2013 Student Readiness Report is Released!

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We are pleased to announce the 2013 Student Readiness Report has been released and is now available.  SmarterServices, LLC, the provider of the SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Indicator, annually analyzes the SmarterMeasure data in aggregate of all of the students from the prior yearwho have taken SmarterMeasure. No data specific to individual students or individual schools is made publicly available.Take a look at our Student Readiness Report infographic. Data in the 2013 report was taken from 351,632 unique students from 275 higher education institutions who took the SmarterMeasure assessment from June 1, 2012 to May 31, 2013. Highlights in the report include the following statistically significant differences between the means of the variables of gender, ethnicity, institution type, age range, and number of prior online courses taken as they relate to student readiness for online learning.

Gender: Females were found to have statistically significant higher means on the construct of individual attributes, typing rate and life factors. Males were found to have statistically significant higher means on the constructs of reading rate and technical knowledge.

Ethnicity: Statistically significant differences in means were reported in all eight constructs based on ethnicity. African-Americans reported the highest mean for Individual Attributes. Caucasian/White reported the highest mean for Reading Recall, Typing Accuracy, Technical Competency and Life Factors. Asian or Pacific Islander reported the highest mean for Typing Rate. Other Race reported the highest mean for Technical Knowledge.

Age Range: Significant differences did exist in six of the eight constructs measured. Generally speaking, age does matter as demonstrated below. For constructs related to personal maturity, older students had the highest means. For constructs related to technical matters, younger students had the highest means. This was consistent with the prior four years’ findings. Number of

Courses: The results demonstrated that experience matters with online learning. In each of the eight constructs measured, as persons took more online courses their readiness measures improved. The differences in the means were statistically significant in six of the seven scales. The greatest difference in means from students with no prior online course experience and those who had taken five or more courses continued (third consecutive year) to be in the area of technical knowledge. This indicates that with experience students can learn to use the technology required for online courses.

Institution Type: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was calculated to determine if differences exist between students of different types of institutions. Significant differences did exist between the types of institutions and the factors of individual attributes on all six constructs measured. Associates Colleges had the highest means for Locus of Control and Persistence. Master’s Colleges and Universities had the highest means for Academic Attributes, Help Seeking, Procrastination and Time Management. Comparisons were also made between profit and not-for-profit institutions. Public institutions had the highest mean for Persistence, Procrastination, and Time Management. Private not-for-profit institutions, which historically are more selective in admissions, had the highest means for Academic Attributes, Help Seeking, and Locus of Control.

This is the fifth year that the Student Readiness Report has been produced. For five years in a row females have had statistically significant higher means in Individual Attributes, and Academic Attributes. Males have had statistically significant higher means for Technical Knowledge for five years. Caucasians have had statistically significant higher means in Technical Knowledge for five years. Students who have taken five or more online courses reported statistically higher means for the four years in Individual Attributes and Technical Knowledge.

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